How to film a panic free commercial for your crowdfunding campaign

“Donatella Versace. Kimora Lee Simmons. Diane Von Furstenberg. Beyonce. Oprah, Oprah,Oprah.”

If you found yourself sitting to next to a black woman nervously chanting those names on the bus, I’d like to apologize for freaking you out. I was going through some things. I figured that in my anxiety I could evoke the energy of those women when I had to step in front of the camera. I mean the blog is called Fashion Week or Die Trying, not “hide in your closet, scared”.

 

Last week I filmed my first commercial. I am using the commercial to relaunch my collection p29:18 on Indiegogo this summer.  While I know that crowdfunding campaigns  are more successful when they have a video, I was scared to make that move. I am a behind the scenes person. Yes I’m vlogging, but I’m doing that reluctantly. I decided that since my passion is to grow this business I need to throw my fears in the garbage. I don’t have the luxury to hide in the shadows. I need to employ all tactics to make this  business a success.  So if you are freaking out about filming a commercial for Facebook or a crowdfunding video, explore these tips:

 

Work with professionals

nekia and key

I’m all about working with the homies, but professionals will ease your nerves. If you have been networking, you have probably added a few new associates that have the skills you need.  It was comforting to have friends on set, because I knew they had my best interest in mind. Additionally I could trust their artistry because this work pays their rent. I also hired a producer who used her network to round out the crew. You don’t have to be a Jack of all trades. You can hire people who know what to do  and learn form them.

 

Make a budget and write it down.

Money stresses me out. I’m learning to  have a more chill relationship with money, but I’m not Scrooge McDuck rich either. If you you are bootstrapping, don’t play yourself.  Create a realistic budget, discuss it with your team and pay people on time. It will help you focus on the important parts of the product.

 

Accept that your body is camera ready.

 Yo I was scared of them 4k cameras! They make everyone look crazy. Instead of being a 31 year business woman, preparing for a commercial I felt like 12 year old walking through a hallway full of bullies. I’m too damn old to be this self conscious and yet I was. I was so nervous that I couldn’t remember my lines, AND I WROTE THE SCRIPT! If  you have any insecurities know this: you are filming because you are a professional with a vision  to share with the world and you are good enough. If you hate your hair, eyes, weight, teeth, toes whatever you are good enough, do what you came to do. It is easy to  get wrapped up in this quest perfection.  Photoshop and Facetune have us  believing that only the flawless deserve to be seen. This is not true. A dope team and a smart budget can have you looking your best and you know what? Your best is good enough.

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I Ain’t Mad- Why I am giving Shea Moisture the benefit of the doubt

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I’m a black woman with an internet connection so I heard about the Shea Moisture ad debacle. In case you haven’t heard, let me give you a brief synopsis. For black women hair is the biggest of deals. Mainly of us are pressured by our families, employers and romantic partners to straighten our hair. In the last decade with the help of online communities there has been a resurgence of black women backing away from dangerous chemicals and expensive weaves and embracing their natural hair.  During this movement Black owned  companies have emerged to support the unique needs of natural black hair. These companies have strong cult followings. One of those companies is Shea Moisture.

With their new campaign, many black women felt that Shea Moisture was trying to act brand new. No longer reppin’ the girls that helped them build their business, the new commercials featured 2 white women and light skin black woman with bouncy ringlets. All the women were beautiful,  no shade.  But this reminded me of those commercials from the 90’s that made  me ashamed of my tightly coiled hair. I didn’t look like the ethnically ambiguous girl in the Pantene commercial who proclaimed that her hair was so healthy it shined.

 

 

I’m grown now. I am confident and filled with self love.  I like my hair in twist, afros, weaves, braids and flat ironed to Michelle Obama perfection, but I get understand the sting. Many times black women feel like we get trends poppin’ but don’t reap the benefits. Creatives and capitalists use our support as fuel to fly far away and never return. It kind of looked like Shea Moisture was doing the same.

I believe something else though. As an black entrepreneur I want Shea Moisture to win BIG. I want them battle to Unilever and Procter & Gamble. Ten years from now I want them to be a titan that can invest in their customers as they develop new ideas. I want a black owned deodorant company and a black owned contact solution company and a black owned nail polish  all at Walgreen’s. We aren’t going to get there without companies like Shea Moisture. So after we snatching edges with shade on Twitter, let’s snatch some market share. I am excited to watch their beauty company grow. It helps me to my open my mind  on where my company can go.